What does the word "vittles" mean?

from Webster’s Dictionary: Victual or Vittle:
1 food supplies, provisions
2 food or provisions for human beings

Welcome from Doug Gazlay

Maybe not at Charity’s Vittles, yet, but it’s happening here!

Welcome to ILoveVittles.com.  It’s my site, created by me, for my connection with Y’all.  I am Doug Gazlay- Pianist, DJ, Artist, and all-around Creative type guy. 

If you are looking for the old ilovevittles site, please click here!
www.charitysvittles.com is Charity Salyers’ site where you’ll find the old site and all information about the restaurant!

Here you’ll find:  recipes, coloring pages, Word Search Puzzles and more!  I hope you enjoy your visit!  – Doug Galay

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Interesting facts about your favorite veggies from Wikipedia

Click on the veggie pic to learn more about each

The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus),[1] also known by the names French artichoke and green artichoke in the U.S.,[2] is a variety of a species of thistle cultivated as a food.

Artichoke

Asparagus, or garden asparagus, folk name sparrow grass, scientific name Asparagus officinalis, is a perennial flowering plant species in the genus Asparagus. Its young shoots are used as a spring vegetable.

Asparagus

Green beans are the unripe, young fruit and protective pods of various cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).[1][2] Immature or young pods of the runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus), yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis), and hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus) are used in a similar way.[3]

Green Beans

The beetroot is the taproot portion of a beet plant,[1] usually known in Canada and the USA as beets while the vegetable is referred to as beetroot in British English, and also known as the table beet, garden beet, red beet, dinner beet or golden beet.

Beets

Broccoli is an edible green plant in the cabbage family (family Brassicaceae, genus Brassica) whose large flowering head and stalk is eaten as a vegetable.

Broccoli

The Brussels sprout is a member of the Gemmifera Group of cabbages (Brassica oleracea), grown for its edible buds.

Brussel Sprouts

Cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads.

Green Cabbage

Cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads.

Red Cabbage

The carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist. They are a domesticated form of the wild carrot, Daucus carota, native to Europe and Southwestern Asia.

Habits, Smile

Cauliflower is one of several vegetables in the species Brassica oleracea in the genus Brassica, which is in the Brassicaceae (or Mustard) family. It is an annual plant that reproduces by seed.

Cauliflower

Celery (Apium graveolens) is a marshland plant in the family Apiaceae that has been cultivated as a vegetable since antiquity. Celery has a long fibrous stalk tapering into leaves.

Celery

Collard refers to certain loose-leafed cultivars of Brassica oleracea, the same species as many common vegetables, including cabbage (Capitata Group) and broccoli (Botrytis Group).

Collards

Maize (/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taino: mahiz), also known as corn (American English), is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago.[1][2]

Corn (Maize)

Summer squash are squashes that are harvested when immature, while the rind is still tender and edible. Nearly all summer squashes are varieties of Cucurbita pepo,[2] though not all Cucurbita pepo are considered summer squashes.

Summer Squash

Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) is a widely cultivated plant in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae. It is a creeping vine that bears cucumiform fruits that are used as vegetables.

Cucumber

Eggplant (USA,[1] Australia,[2] New Zealand, anglophone Canada), aubergine (UK,[3] Ireland, Quebec) or brinjal (South Asia, South Africa)[4] is a plant species in the nightshade family Solanaceae

Eggplant (USA,[1] Australia,[2] New Zealand, anglophone Canada), aubergine (UK,[3] Ireland, Quebec) or brinjal (South Asia, South Africa)[4] is a plant species in the nightshade family Solanaceae

Kale (/keɪl/), or leaf cabbage, belongs to a group of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) cultivars grown for their edible leaves, although some are used as ornamentals.

Kale

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae. It is most often grown as a leaf vegetable, but sometimes for its stem and seeds. Lettuce is most often used for salads, although it is also seen in other kinds of food, such as soups, sandwiches and wraps; it can also be grilled.[3]

Iceberg Lettuce

Leaf – Also known as looseleaf, cutting or bunching lettuce,[36] this type has loosely bunched leaves and is the most widely planted. It is used mainly for salads.[32].

Leaf Lettuce

Romaine/Cos – Used mainly for salads and sandwiches, this type forms long, upright heads. This is the most often used lettuce in Caesar salads.

Romaine Lettuce

Okra (US: /ˈoʊkrə/, UK: /ˈɒkrə/), Abelmoschus esculentus, known in many English-speaking countries as ladies' fingers or ochro, is a flowering plant in the mallow family. It is valued for its edible green seed pods.

Okra

Red onions are cultivars of the onion (Allium cepa) with purplish-red skin and white flesh tinged with red. They are most commonly used in the culinary arts, but the skin of the red onion has also been used as a dye.

Red Onions

The onion (Allium cepa L., from Latin cepa "onion"), also known as the bulb onion or common onion, is a vegetable that is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. Its close relatives include the garlic, scallion, shallot, leek, chive,[2] and Chinese onion.[3].

Onion

The parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) is a root vegetable closely related to carrot and parsley; all belong to the family Apiaceae. It is a biennial plant usually grown as an annual. Its long, tuberous root has cream-colored skin and flesh, and, left in the ground to mature, it becomes sweeter in flavor after winter frosts.

Parsnip

The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow. Botanically, pea pods are fruit,[2] since they contain seeds and develop from the ovary of a (pea) flower.

Green Peas

The bell pepper (also known as sweet pepper, pepper or capsicum /ˈkæpsɪkəm/)[1] is the fruit of plants in the Grossum cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum.[2][3] Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colours, including red, yellow, orange, green, white, and purple.

Bell Pepper

The chili pepper (also chile, chile pepper, chilli pepper, or chilli[4]), from Nahuatl chīlli (Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈt͡ʃiːlːi] (About this soundlisten)), is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum which are members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[5].

chili Pepper

The potato is a root vegetable native to the Americas, a starchy tuber of the plant Solanum tuberosum, and the plant itself, a perennial in the family Solanaceae.[2].

Potato

A pumpkin is a cultivar of winter squash that is round with smooth, slightly ribbed skin, and most often deep yellow to orange in coloration.[1] The thick shell contains the seeds and pulp.

Pumpkin

The radish (Raphanus raphanistrum subsp. sativus or Raphanus sativus) is an edible root vegetable of the family Brassicaceae that was domesticated in Asia prior to Roman times.

Habits, Smile

The rutabaga (/ˌruː.təˈbeɪ.ɡə/) (North American English), swede (Southern English and some Commonwealth English), neep (Scottish), turnip (in some Canadian English and Northern English, including Cornish English) or snagger (Northern English), also called by several other names in different regions (including turnip, though this elsewhere usually refers to the "white turnip"), is a root vegetable that originated as a cross between the cabbage and the turnip.

Rutabaga

The snow pea is an edible-pod pea with flat pods and thin pod walls.[2] It is eaten whole, with both the seeds and the pod, while still unripe.

Snow pea

Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma,[1] is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin.

Butternut Squash

The snap pea, also known as the sugar snap pea, is an edible-pod pea with rounded pods and thick pod walls, in contrast to snow pea pods, which are flat with thin walls.[1] The name mangetout (French for "eat all") can apply to snap peas and snow peas.

Sugar Snap Peas

The tomato is the edible, often red, berry of the plant Solanum lycopersicum,[2][1] commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America and Central America.[2][3].

Tomato

The turnip or white turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa) is a root vegetable commonly grown in temperate climates worldwide for its white, fleshy taproot. The word turnip is a compound of tur- as in turned/rounded on a lathe and neep, derived from Latin napus, the word for the plant.

Turnip

The zucchini (/zuːˈkiːni/) or courgette (/kʊərˈʒɛt/) (Cucurbita pepo) is a summer squash, of Mesoamerican origin, which can reach nearly 1 metre (40 inches) in length, but is usually harvested when still immature at about 15 to 25 cm (6 to 10 in).

Zucchini

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